Why does Maggie say Dee can have the quilts?

Why does Dee want Maggie to have the quilts?

Dee wants the old quilts for several reasons but mainly because she wants to display them as part of her “heritage” in her home in the city. … When Maggie thinks of the quilts, she remembers how she was taught to make them and uses them because she believes that that is what her grandma would want her to do.

Why does Mama give the quilts to Maggie instead of Dee?

Mama, the narrator, ultimately gives the family quilts to Maggie instead of Dee (Wangero) because she recognizes that Dee gets everything she wants, that she’s even already claimed the quilts as her own, because they were promised to Maggie, and because Maggie is the daughter who wants them for the right reasons.

THIS IS AMAZING:  Which holds bobbin in sewing machine?

What do the quilts mean to Dee and Maggie?

These quilts are familial heirlooms, and Maggie’s mother likes to use them as often as possible. They represent the family’s history and heritage to each character. Her mother and grandmother see the quilts as symbols of history and heritage, and they cherish this history very dearly.

What is the significance of Maggie saying I can member Grandma Dee without the quilts?

Maggie’s understanding of her heritage also comes through when she tells Mama that Dee can have the quilts because “I can ‘member Grandma Dee without the quilts” (413). … It is clear from Maggie’s statement that her “everyday use” of the quilts would be as a reminder of her Grandma Dee.

When Mama doesn’t give Dee the quilts How does Maggie feel?

In Alice Walker’s short story “Everyday Use,” Mama feels comfortable leaving the quilts to Maggie rather than to Dee (Wangero) for a number of reasons, including the following: She wants to affirm Maggie, who lacks the self-confidence that Dee possesses in abundance. Dee doesn’t need much affirmation from others.

What does Dee mean when she says mama doesn’t understand their heritage?

When Dee/Wangero tells her mother, “You just don’t understand… your heritage,” she implies that hand-made artistic items in their family should be put on display instead of being used. … Dee has rejected her birth name, which comes from Dicie, a family name traceable to the Civil War, in favor of Wangero.

Why would Mama prefer Maggie get the quilts and use them for everyday use?

Her desire to hang the quilts, in a museumlike exhibit, suggests that she feels reverence for them but that to her they are essentially foreign, impersonal objects. Mama understands that Maggie, not Dee, should have the quilts, because Maggie will respect them by using them in the way they were intended to be used.

THIS IS AMAZING:  How long is 100g DK yarn?

Why does Dee want the quilts so bad?

Dee wants the quilts to display them in her home as symbols of this greater heritage and as symbols of that which defined her ancestor’s humanity before captivity dehumanized them. Neither Dee nor her mother are right or wrong since Dee’s mother’s sense of ancestry extends only to her valued and cherished memories.

What terrible thing happened to Maggie when she was a child everyday use?

What terrible thing happened to Maggie when she was a child? Severely burned in a house fire when she was a child, her scarred, ugly appearance hides her sympathetic, generous nature. She lives at home and is protected by Mama, remaining virtually untouched by the outside world.

What was Maggie going to do with the quilts?

‘” Dee wants to hang the quilts on her wall, to display them as evidence of some heritage that is in the past, that is dead. Maggie, however, knows how to quilt and would use the quilts for the reason for which they were created: to keep warm.

What do the quilts symbolize in everyday use to Dee?

Quilts. … The quilts are pieces of living history, documents in fabric that chronicle the lives of the various generations and the trials, such as war and poverty, that they faced. The quilts serve as a testament to a family’s history of pride and struggle.

Why is Dee angry at the end of the story?

At the end of the story, Dee, who was always brighter, better-looking, and favored, is angry because her mother refuses to give the quilts which she, Grandma Dee, and Big Dee made over the years.

THIS IS AMAZING:  How do you get rid of an ongoing stitch?