Quick Answer: What length should my sewing machine be on?

What is a normal stitch length?

The average stitch length for mid-weight fabrics is 2.5 to 3 mm/10 to 12 spi. The average stitch length for fine fabrics is 2 mm/13 to 20 spi. For heavier fabrics, basting, or topstitching, use 4 to 5 mm/5 to 6 spi.

How do you determine your stitch length?

The theory behind stitch length is pretty straight forward. The shorter the stitches, the more will be packed into each inch of stitching, creating a tighter seam. The longer the stitches, the fewer within each inch, therefore, the looser the seam. Short equals tight; long equals loose.

Why is my bottom stitch not straight?

If your thread is pulled tight on the underside and not forming an even stitch then (counter-intuitively) it’s usually the top thread tension that’s wrong. Sometimes very lightweight fabrics such as sheers can get dragged down into the machine so it’s a good idea to use a straight stitch plate.

What setting should my sewing machine be on?

Most sewing is done in the 2.0 to 2.5 range. If you are foundation paper piecing, you may want to decrease your stitch length so that the paper tears away easier. Top stitching and quilting are usually done in the 3.0 to 3.5 range.

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What is maximum stitch width?

All machines measure the stitch width in millimeters (mm). Some makes and models have a maximum stitch width of 4 to 6 mm. Others create stitches as wide as 9 mm.

What is the regular setting for the stitch width?

A straight stitch has no width so it makes sense to set the dial at “0”. However, each machine varies so you will want to set the Stitch Width dial at the position where the needle is centered over the stitch plate. This will give you the most accurate seam allowance.

What does the stitch count on a sewing machine mean?

Actually, there are two separate stitch counts on a sewing machine — similar to a car. One is the lifetime stitch count, and the other is the maintenance count. When you sew so many stitches, the oil light comes on, or the “time for maintenance” light.

Why are my stitches so small?

With the stitch length changing there are a couple of possibilities for you to investigate: Is the thread catching somewhere in the path to the needle and then coming ‘un-caught’? … That increased tension causes smaller stitches. Though usually, at some point, the thread will break.